How Hawkeye’s Best Relationship With The Avengers Was A Weird DC Comics Tribute

0

[ad_1]

In the latest Comic Book Legends Revealed, find out if Mockingbird has teamed up with Hawkeye in an attempt to give Marvel its own version of Green Arrow and Black Canary.

Welcome to Comic Book Legends Revealed! This is the eight hundred and twenty-first episode where we take a look at three comic book legends and determine if they are right or wrong. As usual, there will be three posts, one for each of the three captions.

NOTE: if my twitter page reached 5,000 subscribers, I will be doing a bonus edition of Comic Book Legends Revealed that week. Good deal, right? So will follow my Twitter page, Brian_Cronin!


COMIC LEGEND:

Mockingbird was designed as Marvel’s answer to Black Canary

STATUS:

Basically true

Long before working as a professional comic book editor and writer, Mark Gruenwald was already one of the most thoughtful and observant writers in the world of comic book fanzines. Gruenwald edited, designed and wrote much of his own fanzine, Omniverse, which was all about exploring continuity in the comics.

Gruenwald has also written a series of articles for DC’s in-house magazine, The Amazing World of DC Comics. As you can see from the Omnivesis introduction, Gruenwald was not only a thoughtful and interesting guy, but he was a thoughtful and interesting guy who had some pretty hard and quick opinions about things and how things should be done.



While Gruenwald was very fascinated with the world of DC and would have loved working for this company, it turned out that the job available for him at the time was at Marvel, so Gruenwald went to work as an associate editor at Marvel. and quickly rose through the ranks and became one of Marvel Editorial’s most notable figures in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as being a beloved writer, writing Captain America for a decade and write (and draw!) the Hawk Eye miniseries that first paired Hawkeye and Mockingbird.

This Hawkeye and Mockingbird series ended with the marriage of the two heroes …



RELATED: The Secret Origin of Harley Quinn’s ‘Puddin’ Nickname For Joker

However, the interesting thing about Mockingbird is that it was always meant to be associated with Hawkeye, as its creator, Mark Gruenwald, initially proposed the character as Marvel’s response to Black Canary so that she could be associated with. Hawkeye as Black Canary. was with Green Arrow!


In an old comic book legend revealed many moons ago, I explained how Gruenwald invented a character named Mockingbird who was going to fight Spider-Woman during Gruenwald’s time as the writer of this series. She was going to be African American and eventually she would end up dating Hawkeye. Gruenwald never had time to introduce the character, and when Bobbi Morse needed a new superhero identity because his then codename Huntress had just been used by DC for a new one. character, Gruenwald let Steven Grant take the name and costume design from Bobbi Morse. in a number of Marvel Team where Bobbi took the name Mockingbird …



In issue # 56 of TwoMorrows, the always informative Jarrod Buttery interviewed Grant about it, and he explained the Black Canary influences of the character: From the Justice League. Not parallel world versions like Squadron Supreme, but a Marvel-Earth version. He had notebooks and notebooks at home full of character names and drawings, and gave me notebooks to go through to see if there was anything there I liked as a new identity for Bobbi, since the identity of the Huntress was rotated by, ironically, Paul Levitz creating a character of Huntress for DC. One of the characters in Marvel’s Diary was a Marvel-land version of Black Canary, who in Mark’s version was actually black, which he intended to pair up with Hawkeye, the pre-existing Marvel parallel to Green Arrow. His name was Mockingbird. I actually wasn’t crazy about the name, but it was way better than anything I’d found at the time, so it was Mockingbird. “


RELATED: The Weird Behind The Scenes Origin Of The Human Torch’s Encounter With The Spider-Man Clone

Grant, however, didn’t pursue Hawkeye’s intended angle (okay, he only had one problem doing anything with the character, and he was using that to follow an old story on traitors inside SHIELD), but three years later Gruenwald took up the idea and did it himself in the Hawk Eye mini-series.


Its deputy editor, at the time, Mike Carlin, also told Buttery how the show’s plan was still to pair Hawkeye and Mockingbird together to be Marvel’s Green Arrow and Black Canary, “The whole arc of the story was planned from the start. Mark was a huge fan of the Marvel and DC universes, and he loved the relationship DC’s Green Arrow had with Black Canary, so much, Mark made the Marvel version of that relationship slightly different by asking his archer / bird-lady to take the plunge … Mockingbird was created as a Black Canary type, and Mark put them together after the fact, the same way DC did.


It was a thoughtful idea, which was quite normal for the great Gruenwald, whom we lost too young in 1995. His widow, Catherine Schuller Gruenwald, does a good job, however, in keeping Gruenwald’s name and beliefs so that everyone can continue to learn!

Thanks again to Jarrod Buttery, Steven Grant and Mike Carlin for this fascinating information!

SOME OTHER LEGENDS OF ENTERTAINMENT!

Check out some entertainment legends from Legends Revealed:

1. Was Carol Hathaway originally going to die in the ER pilot?

2. Did Tom Selleck force Blue Bloods to reverse a character being deleted from the show?

3. What lyrics to “Don’t Bring Me Down” by ELO sound like “Bruce”?


4. Has Clark Kent ever transformed into Superman in a phone booth on TV?

COMING SOON PART TWO!

Check back soon for this episode’s Legends Part 2!

Please feel free to send me any suggestions for future comic book legends at [email protected] or [email protected]

KEEP READING: Did Joss Whedon Nearly Write X-Men Instead of Grant Morrison?

Thor Dark Phoenix

New Dark Phoenix took her relationship with Thor a horrific twist


About the Author


[ad_2]
Source link

Share.

Comments are closed.