How the 1990s in comics became an era of “Insta-Mullets”

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Today we’re looking at five examples of comic book characters having “instant mullets” out of nowhere.

In Drawing Crazy Patterns, I highlight at least five comic story scenes/moments that fit a specific theme (essentially, things that happen frequently in comics). Note that these lists are by their nature not exhaustive. This is a list of five examples (from time to time I’ll be nice and add a sixth). Thus, no instance is “missing” if it is not listed. It’s just not one of the five examples I chose.

Today is my buddy Albert Ching’s birthday. I always like to do a 1990s themed post for Albert’s birthday, so here we are! Last year I wrote about how the Man of Steel lost his mighty mule in the 1990s, and today I think I’m going to shed some light on this weird thing that happened in the comics of the time when the characters just popped mules out of NOWHERE.

AQUAMAN REALIZED HOW COOL LONG HAIR LIKES WAVING IN THE OCEAN

In Aquaman’s story, the character had a few weird times where he just seemed like VANISH from the DC Universe. Unfortunately, it was just a matter of no one having anything interesting to do with the character. However, he was just too remarkable a character to totally ignore Atlantis, so he continued to have chances. Luckily, Peter David eventually gave him a great ongoing series that lasted several years (after David set up the race in a great miniseries, The Chronicles of Atlantisin 1990).

During one of Aquaman’s dry spells (pun unintentional, but I wish I had thought of it intentionally), he teamed up with two of his fellow superheroes, Superman and Batman, to investigate about the Suicide Squad’s involvement in the alleged death. of their former comrade in arms, Ray Palmer, the Atom (I actually wrote about this story last year). They discovered that Ray was actually alive. They discussed the deal with Ray in suicide squad #62 (by John Ostrander, Kim Yale, Geof Isherwood and Robert Campanela). Notice Aquaman’s hair.

During this suicide squad storyline, however, Aquaman gained its own series in Aquaman #1 (by Shaun McLaughlin, Ken Hooper and Bob Dvorak) and now he’s rocking a great flowing mullet…

RELATED: Five Times Superheroes Had No Mouths But Had To Scream

BOOSTER GOLD – THE MULE OF THE FUTURE!

After the departure of Keith Giffen and JM DeMatteis Justice League America, Dan Jurgens took over the series as a new writer (as well as the artist, doing layouts for Rick Burchett), and Booster Gold returned to the team, reforming “Blue and Gold” with the Blue Beetle. Jurgens tried to bring a sort of old school Justice League feel to the series, as seen in the opening cover of his first issue on the book, a reference to a classic Justice League of America script…

Notice Booster Gold’s hair.

Well, right after this story ends, in Justice League America #63, Booster Gold was now rocking a big mullet on his mask…

I guess Jurgens’ position was that Booster Gold was still a guy trying to be hip in his day and mules were cool back then.

HERCULES LOST HIS BEARD AND GAINED A MULE!

Hercules is a bit of a tricky subject, as his hair was never exactly a crew cut or anything like that, but I think we can agree that it clearly wasn’t a mullet when the classic creative team of the Avengers composed of Bob Harras, Steve Epting and Tom Palmer took over the book in avengers #343…

The problem at the time (well, “problem”, since it’s really not that bad) was that Thor was rocking a beard at the time and Thor’s beard couldn’t be shaved since he had his own beard in avengers #350 (by Harras, Epting and Palmer), Hercules’ beard is shaved…

It didn’t seem to automatically give him a mullet, as we saw in avengers #355, because it looked like he just had longer hair…

But then, in avengers #357, we see that Hercule rocks the mule look “business in front, party behind”…

By the time Hercules got a new costume a few issues later, he was basically doing a Sylvester Stallone in the 1980s, hair-wise.

RELATED: You Really Don’t Want To Be A Superhero Mom’s Young Child

AT THE END OF THE TITANS HUNT, DICK GRAYSON’S HAIR TAKES A LEAP

Once the Titans Hunt story is complete, New Titans was in a weird blocking pattern, and with lots of delays and replacement artists, that’s how you get Tom Grummett drawing Dick Grayson without a mullet in the early parts of New Titans #86…

but Jerome Moore kinda gave him one at the end of the issue (I believe Al Vey inked the whole issue)…

The following issue was also filled with replacement artists (and Al Vey) and Dan Jurgens went all out with the mullet…

I guess that was intentional, though, since the Next The issue saw Grummett redesign Nightwing’s costume and the mullet was a big part of it…

Nightwing’s hair got much weirder over the next few years.

THE SPIDER-MAN CLONE HAS BECOME HIS OWN MAN… BY CULTIVATING A MULE!

During the 1990s clone saga, the whole hook of Spider-Man clone Ben Reilly is that he looked exactly like Peter Parker (Ben even stood in for Peter in prison when Peter was briefly framed for murder) .

At one point, Peter and Ben were convinced that Ben was actually the original and Peter was actually the clone!

In Spectacular Spider-Man #229 (by Tom DeFalco, Sal Buscema and Bill Sienkiewicz), Peter and Ben team up and we see that they look alike, even in their haircuts…

Peter decides to give up being Spider-Man, entrusting New York to Ben (who was using the superhero name Scarlet Spider at the time).

Well, right after that, the Spider-Man titles all pretended to start over as the Scarlet Spider comics and in the first one, Scarlet Spider’s Web #1 (by Tom DeFalco, Todd Dezago, Paris Karounos and Randy Emberlin) we see that Ben is now cradling a mule…

Ben is forced to take on the Spider-Man identity soon after, and the mule is soon made history.


EXAMPLE OF A SPECIAL BONUS THAT IS NOT REALLY FIT! GUY GARDNER’S HAIR GOT WEIRD WHEN HE BECAME AN ALIEN

During Guy Gardner’s time when he discovered he was part alien (and thus gained superpowers through his alien heritage), his hair was cut quite close, as shown Guy GardnerWarrior #32 (by Beau Smith, Joyce Chin, Ken Branch, Rodney Ramos, and Andy Lanning) during a fight with the Justice League as part of a crossover…

At the end of the crossover, Guy’s hair was a bit longer in Guy GardnerWarrior #34 (by Smith, Marc Campos and Dan Davis)…

But the very next issue saw Joyce Chin and John Stokes grow Guy’s hair A LOT…

Mad. Not a mule, but still mad.

Happy birthday Albert!

If anyone has any suggestions for a future crazy pattern design, message me at [email protected]!


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